Spray Sunscreen May be Unsafe for Children

 

SunscreenConsumer Reports recently recommended not spraying sunscreen on children.  Past tests of sunscreen by Consumer reports found that some contain titanium dioxide and zinc oxide which could have nanoparticles — particles known for causing developmental issues in animals. The fear is that children are more susceptible to inhaling the fumes from spray sunscreens. The FDA began investigating this issue back in 2011 and has yet to reveal its findings.

For now, Consumer Reports recommends the following if you use spray sunscreens:

Don’t use sprays on children, unless you have no other product available. In that case, spray the sunscreen onto your hands and rub it on. As with all sunscreens, be especially careful on the face, taking care to avoid the eyes and mouth.

Adults can still use sprays—but don’t spray your face! Instead, spray on your hands and rub it on, making sure to avoid your eyes and mouth. And try to avoid inhaling it.

• Make sure you apply enough. Our tests have found that sprays can work well when used properly—but it is harder to make sure that you apply enough, especially when it’s windy. We recommend spraying as much as can be evenly applied, and then repeating, just to be safe. On windy days, you might want to spray the sunscreen on your hands and rub it on—or just choose one of our recommended lotions instead.

You can find the Consumer Reports article here: http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/news/2011/07/don-t-spray-sunscreens-on-kids-at-least-for-now/index.htm

The American Academy of Dermatology also recommends never spraying sunscreen around your or your child’s face or mouth and to be mindful of the wind direction to avoid inhalation.

You can find the AAD’s recommendation on sunscreens here: http://www.aad.org/media-resources/stats-and-facts/prevention-and-care/sunscreens

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Some Weight Loss Drugs Contain “Hidden Drugs” that Can Lead to Death, FDA Warns

FDA Warning15372820-small

FDA has identified an emerging trend where over-the-counter products, frequently represented as dietary supplements, contain hidden active ingredients that could be harmful. Consumers may unknowingly take products laced with varying quantities of approved prescription drug ingredients, controlled substances, and untested and unstudied pharmaceutically active ingredients. These deceptive products can harm you! Hidden ingredients are increasingly becoming a problem in products promoted for weight loss.

Cleveland.com [http://www.cleveland.com/healthfit/index.ssf/2014/07/fda_warns_of_prescription_drug.html] reported that the FDA has warned consumers NOT to use the following weight loss supplements due to them containing a dangerous drug known to cause heart attacks and strokes:

1. Mix Fruit Slimming sold on Amazon

2. Lingzhi Cleansed Slim Tea sold on Amazon

3. Trim Fast

4. 24 ince

5. Sliming (sic) Diet by Pretty White sold on ebay

6. Lipo

FDA’s List of additional products just for 2014 with “hidden drugs:”

You can watch the FDA’s video on “Tainted Weight Loss Products” here: http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/ResourcesForYou/Consumers/BuyingUsingMedicineSafely/MedicationHealthFraud/ucm234592.htm.

 

FDA to Parents – DON’T Use Lidocaine Viscous on Infants to Treat Teething Pain

FDA Warning

The FDA just notified health professionals and caregivers of infants that prescription oral viscous lidocaine (2% solution) should not be used to treat infants and children with teething pain.  The FDA will now require a “Boxed Warning” to the drug labeling that will highlight this warning.

This year the FDA reviewed 22 case reports of serious adverse reactions in infants and children. The adverse reactions noted were seizures, severe brain damage, heart problems, and even death. The age range for the reviews was 5 months to 3.5 years old.

The FDA further advised that viscous lidocaine should NOT be prescribed by doctors, and warned parents that even over-the-counter topical medications should not be used due to potential harmful side effects.

You can find the FDA’s Drug Safety Communication Notice here: http://www.fda.gov/Drugs/DrugSafety/ucm402240.htm

You can find the FDA’s Consumer Update Notice here: http://www.fda.gov/ForConsumers/ConsumerUpdates/ucm385817.htm